News

News items of interest to TSF members 

 

The first two items below are important and require attention on the part of all TSF members.

 

TSF Data Protection Policy and Privacy Statement
You may have received messages from other organisations you belong to, asking you to update your consent for them to hold your contact data and use it to send you information or to manage your membership. This is because of new regulations taking effect in May 2018 about data storage and use which affect all organisations big and small – or even tiny! Penalties for non-compliance are worryingly severe and we  are taking this seriously. 

We have prepared a Privacy Statement and a Data Protection Policy which you can find on the TSF FAQs page – click on the tab above. What we need now is for you to give us permission to hold and use your personal information in the ways described in those documents. To do this would you please download, complete and return this form either by post or by e-mail to martin.graebe@btinternet.com

We will not be able to communicate with you after May 2018 if you do not give us your permission to do so, please Do It Now before it slips your mind.

[Added 23 Mar 2018]

 

TSF Membership – a big change!
We have been thinking about the way in which you become members of TSF and about the subscriptions that you pay. We have come to believe that even at the very low level that we have been asking, payment is a barrier that prevents some people from joining (or renewing their membership). Our aim was always that TSF would be an inclusive organisation and we believe that the best way to attract and maintain an active membership is to stop asking for an annual subscription. 

We will still need to raise money to support our activities and we propose to do that by creating the Friends of the Traditional Song Forum. Those who choose to become a friend will agree to make an annual donation that goes into our funds. We aim to set up a system where Friends can choose a level of annual donation: £2, £5, £10, £15 or more. We will develop a mechanism for doing this over the next few weeks, and we will then get back to you with the details but if you wish to join the Friends of TSF please drop me a message and I will get back to you when we have got ourselves organised.

If you have already paid your subscription for 2018 we would like to consider you a friend – but please let us know if you do not wish to formally become a Friend of TSF.

I hope that you will welcome this move and choose to continue to support us in the coming years. After careful consideration we think that by doing this we will give everyone an opportunity to support TSF financially according to their means – or not at all, if they choose. 

[Added 23 Mar 2018]

 

Next TSF meeting
The Spring 2018 meeting of the Traditional Song Forum will take place at Cecil Sharp House, London on 28 April. The programme for the day is still being finalised, but the topic for our afternoon ‘Forum Focus’ session will be A Strange Survival, putting songs into print. When the Traditional Song Forum was created 20 years ago there was an expectation that the printed book would be replaced by digital technology. This has not happened and, indeed, the flow of new books on traditional song and related topics continues unabated. In this meeting we will look at traditional song in print and provide an opportunity for all those interested in writing, publishing, using or enjoying songs on paper. The draft programme is can be downloaded here and will be updated in the next few days. Tickets for this free event are available from Eventbrite – click here to book your place for this interesting day.

[Updated 23 Mar 2018]

 

A new book and another being planned

As if to demonstrate the point above, that new books are emerging at an amazing rate, David Atkinson has sent me new of his latest publication and news of his next venture.

The new book is called The Ballad and its Pasts, Literary Histories and the Play of Memory  and you can find more details at https://boydellandbrewer.com/the-ballad-and-its-pasts-hb.html. You can use the offer code BB125 at the checkout should get 25% off. David adds tat, if enough people are interested, he may be able to offer a bigger discount at the TSF meeting on 28 April.

His next project, working with Steve Roud, is another book about broadsides, this time covering Continental Europe. He writes:

‘A few years ago, we initiated a series of volumes devoted to the history of Street Literature and Cheap Print in Britain, and have so far edited two collections of essays which have been well received. For our next volume, we are hoping for a Europe-wide focus, and we would like to compile a collection of essays, each devoted to a particular European country, region, or language-area. We think that this would be both interesting and instructive for students and researchers in this field. All chapters will be in English and should constitute a historical overview of the subject in the chosen area, or, if more appropriate, a case study of a particular section of the trade. Length: 5,000 – 10,000 words. We are in the early planning stages, but we would hope to publish in early 2019. We are more interested in historical periods than in present-day manifestations. From a British perspective, we define Street Literature as comprising cheap printed materials, aimed at the lower or working classes, sold in streets, at fairs, from travelling pedlars’ packs, in local shops, and so on. Our material obviously has affinities with other printed materials such as leaflets, proclamations, handbills, advertisements, and so on, but it is the selling aspect which is the basic definitional element. In Britain, our main categories are single-sheet broadsides, chapbooks (double-sided single sheet folded to make a crude book), cheap illustrative items such as woodcuts, engravings, etc., and the subjects covered are many – ballads, tales, political and religious comments, jokes, fortune-telling, news and fake news, and so on. But we are of course aware that in other countries other definitions might apply.

We would be pleased to hear from anyone who might be willing to contribute to this project, so please pass this message on to anyone you think might be interested. Contact David Atkinson (david.atkinson@zen.co.uk) or Steve Roud (steveroud@gmail.com).

[Updated 23 Mar 2018]

 

Exhibition featuring the work of Doc Rowe

An exhibition, Lore and the living archive, opens on 5 May at Touchstones, Rochdale. It features the work of three artists and their response to the Doc Rowe Archive and Collection, with artefacts from the Archive on display. The gallery will also be given over to a Wakes Day-style celebration on 26 May,. See Lore And The Living Archive for more details.

[Added 14 Mar 2018]

 

New book at a discounted price for TSF members

Oskar Cox Jensen is one of the editors of an interesting new book  ‘Charles Dibdin & Late Georgian Culture’, published by OUP at £55. He has kindly provided a code that will make it possible for TSF members to buy the book with a 30% discount. For more details download the Charles Dibdin Flyer which will give you the code.

[Added 5 Mar 2018]

 

New Date for Aberdeen Workshop

The workshop in Aberdeen –  Finding Scottish Songs and Ballads Online, with Julia Bishop, Laura Smyth, and Janice Reavall, (See ‘Three Workshops and a Concert’ below) has now been re-scheduled for Sunday 22 April 2018. To book, email shirley.watt795@btinternet.com. A free buffet lunch will be provided (please let us know of any dietary requirements or allergies). Remember your laptop.

[Added 5 Mar 2018]

 

TSF Autumn Meeting

The Autumn meeting of the Traditional Song Forum will be held at Newcastle University on 20 October. It will also be the occasion for the Roy Palmer Lecture for 2018 which is to be given by Grace Toland, the Director of the Irish Traditional Music Archive. Further details will be available here when we have them.

[Added 5 Mar 2018]

 

Baring-Gould’s Songs of the West on Project Gutenberg

On 22 February Lewis Jones put out a short message on Tradsong to say that the 1905 edition of Sabine Baring-Gould’s Songs of the West had been published on the Project Gutenberg website – http://www.gutenberg.org/files/56625/56625-h/56625-h.htm. I have also heard from Linda Cantoni who is a member of the project team who prepared the book for online publication. I wanted to add to Lewis’s message because I believe that the way in which Project Gutenberg have implemented the digitisation of the book is a leap forward from similar exercises in the past.

The book appears as a mixture of newly prepared text and images of the original music. The first item that comes up after the title page are two indices, the first by its place in the book and the second alphabetical. Each index entry has a hyperlink to the song image and text. The indices are followed by Baring-Gould’s Preface and Introduction. In the latter you will find that, if a song is mentioned, the title is hyperlinked to the song.

Between the image of the music and the song text there are three links for each song. The first plays the music. I am pleased to discover that it is not just the melody that is played but the arrangement as well, though the melody is voiced in such a way that it can be heard plainly above the accompaniment. The second link is to the XML coding for the music and the third to Baring-Gould’s note on the song (The notes appear at the end of the book and have links to take you back to the song again).

This is a well thought-through piece of work that makes great use of digital technology to add value to the traditional book form. In the 1905 edition of Songs of the West the majority of the arrangements were by Cecil Sharp. Several of Henry Fleetwood Sheppard’s arrangements were retained from the earlier editions, as well as a few by Frederick Bussell. This gives us the opportunity, through the playback, to hear the approach of each of these three musicians – though a direct comparison of Sharp’s arrangements with those that Sheppard composed for the same song is not possible.

Well done to Project Gutenberg for this excellent piece of work. And thank you, Lewis, for drawing our attention to it.

Addition: Linda Cantoni wrote to me again after I posted this and I thought I would share her description of the process that they go through with you:

The ‘Songs of the West’ project was the brainchild of a Cornishman, Chris Curnow, who volunteers at Distributed Proofreaders, http://www.pgdp.net. He provided the image scans and OCR text. DP volunteers then proofread and formatted the text in several rounds “one page at a time” (part of our slogan). I’m one of a handful of music transcribers at DP who’s also qualified to “post-process” a project, i.e., finalize it by doing last checks, then creating the plaintext, HTML, and mobile e-book versions. So Chris asked me to take it on. I used Finale 25 and a midi keyboard to create the sound files. It took a couple of years to complete, but that was in part because “real life” got in the way at times and I had to take breaks.

We have produced some other large music projects, but because we don’t have a lot of volunteers who are capable of transcribing music, we haven’t done that many. You might be interested in the two volumes of D’Urfey’s Pills that we’ve done (Vol. 5 is at http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/26679, and Vol. 6 is at http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/33404) – even though the Rev. Baring-Gould thought D’Urfey’s work was, let us say, crass.

You mentioned the accompaniment. I have to say that I was absolutely delighted with the quality of the arrangements made by Baring-Gould’s co-authors. I’ve worked on quite a few 19th-Century books with songs, and all too often the accompaniment is unsatisfyingly simplistic or just not very good. These were a joy to transcribe.

And I thought that you might like to know about another small treasure on the Project Gutenberg website that I discovered while doing a search for Lucy Broadwood, for which Linda also did the music transcriptions. Have a look at  http://www.gutenberg.org/files/36308/36308-h/36308-h.htm

[Updated 27 Feb 2018]

 

Percy Grainger recordings online

Janet Topp Fargion has written from the British Library with exciting news about the debut of the folk song recordings made by Percy Grainger in the British Library’s ‘Sounds’ Archive as a result of a major project by BLSA staff member, Andrea Zarza.

Andrea says:

We thought you might like to know that World & Traditional Music has just published a new collection of sound recordings of English folk song, made by composer Percy Grainger in England, between 1906 and 1908. You can read more about the collection in a guest blog post written by folklorist Steve Roud and listen to individual songs on Sounds.

The British Library is pleased to make available online around 350 English folk songs recorded by composer Percy Grainger in different regions of England between 1906 and 1909. Thanks to the generous support of the National Folk Music Fund, these sound recordings have been catalogued and indexed by librarian, researcher and folklorist Steve Roud, author of Folk Song in England (Faber & Faber, 2017). Roud has also married them up with Grainger’s transcriptions of the songs, where these exist, on the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library website, thanks to their digitisation of the Percy Grainger Manuscript Collection. Links have also been included on the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library website to corresponding sound recordings featured on Sounds. Listeners are thus able to hear the songs whilst following Grainger’s unique transcriptions of recordings by singers such as Joseph Taylor, Joseph Leaning, George Gouldthorpe, Charles Rosher, William Fishlock, Tom Roberts, Dean Robinson, and many more. All recordings have been catalogued to include Roud numbers (this number refers to songs listed in the online databases Folk Song Index and Broadside Index), Grainger’s Melody numbers, and the numerical references to the discs and wax cylinders these sound recordings existed on previously. 

 

Three Workshops and a Concert

Not a new movie starring Hugh Grant. Julia Bishop has asked me to let you know about three free workshops on the Carpenter collection online, two in Scotland and one in London. The dates are:

  • 3 March, Edinburgh –  Finding Scottish Songs and Ballads Online, with Julia Bishop, Laura Smyth, and Chris Wright
  • 4 March, Aberdeen –  Finding Scottish Songs and Ballads Online, with Julia Bishop, Laura Smyth, and Janice Reavall
  • 25 March, London – Finding Folk Music Online, with Julia Bishop, Laura Smyth, and Emily Askew

and the Concert, which is also free: 40,000 Miles in Quest of Tradition: A Celebration of Carpenter Folk Online, Tuesday 27 March, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, Cecil Sharp House, London

For more details and for links to tickets go to Carpenter events 2018

 

Broadside Day 2018
Before that we have the Broadside Day, which will be held at Cambridge University Library on Saturday 24 February 2018. The event is being hosted by the Rare Books department of Cambridge University who have the largest collection of 18th and 19th century broadsides in Britain. The papers to be presented will include:

  • David Stenton – The Forth Valley Songster
  • Oskar Cox Jensen – Never Look a Ballad-Singer in the Mouth
  • Georgina Prineppi – From the Garden to the Street: Pleasure Garden Music and Broadsides in Eighteenth-Century London
  • Jonathan Cooper – Children’s Chapbooks
  • David Hopkin – Lacemakers, Ballads and Broadsides
  • E. Wyn James – ‘The Shepherd’s World’: The Earliest Welsh Broadside Ballad
  • Colin Bargery – Adventures in a Steamboat: A Broadside history of the impact of a new technology.
  • David Atkinson – Street Literature in Petticoat Lane, 1740s–1760s
  • Giles Bergel – The Stationers’ Company and the English Ballad Trade, 1550-1800 

The running order and other details are now being finalized and will be available shortly. Tickets for the event can be purchased from the EFDSS website .
 

VWML Library Lectures
The New Year also sees a new series of Library Lectures organised by the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library. They include:
 
Wednesday 17 January, 7.30pm–9pm
Dr Caroline Radcliffe – ‘They’ve done me, they’ve robbed me, but, thank God, I’m champion still’: Dan Leno, Clog Dancing and the Victorian Music Hall by Caroline Radcliffe
 
Wednesday 21 February, 7.30pm–9pm
On the Banks of the Green Willow: George Butterworth—Dancer, Folk Song Collector and Composer by Derek Schofield
 
Wednesday 21 March, 7.30pm–9pm
Dr Paul Cowdell – ‘I have believed in spirits from that day unto this’: The Ghostly Crew [Roud 1922], ghostlore and tradtional song.
 
Wednesday 18 April, 7.30pm–9pm
Martin Graebe – Sabine Baring-Gould and his Search for the Folk Songs of Devon and Cornwall.
 
More details and booking information can be found on the VWML website.
 

Locating Women in ‘The Folk’
Another event that you should be aware of is the symposium being organised by Sussex Traditions in association with Sussex and Brighton – Locating Women in ‘The Folk’, Perspectives on women’s contributions to folk song, folklore, and cultural traditions. It will take place on 9 June 2018 (venue to be confirmed). The publicity says:
 
Women have always been central to the study and practice of folklore, arts and cultural traditions – as tradition bearers, performers, authors, collectors, storytellers and scholars. However, their contribution hasn’t always received the recognition it deserves; this symposium aims to redress the balance. We are inviting 20-minute papers/presentations and A1 poster presentations on relevant topics, which may include:
 
• Singers, dancers, musicians, storytellers, and other performance roles
• Performance styles, repertoire and source
• Facilitators, revivals and teaching
• Contributions to scholarship
• Legacies and archives
• Gender relations in folk cultures
• Life narratives, autoethnographies, biographies, and oral histories
• Depictions of women as subject matter in song and story
• Portrayals of women, gender roles, and identity
• Perspectives on the future for women in ‘the folk’

 
We welcome applications from all levels within academia, as well as from independent researchers, writers and enthusiasts.
Please send proposals of 250 words, a short biography, and the mode of presentation (paper, presentation, poster) to lizzie.bennett@sussextraditions.org by January 7th 2018.
This conference is co-presented by Sussex Traditions, The Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research (University of Sussex), and The English Folk Dance & Song Society, and supported by The Centre for Memories, Narratives and Histories (Brighton University), and Sussex University’s Music Department.’
 
You can find more information on the Sussex Traditions website.
 

EFDSS Song Conference 2018
A very early notification for the next EFDSS Song Conference to be held on 9 – 11 November 2018. These dates are hot off the – er, well e-mail from Steve, actually – No further details of the event are available yet.
 

 

News Archive

Previous news items of longer term interest have been archived – click to view the News Archive